Comic Book Team Dynamics

Team dynamics
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by
on May 20, 2013
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Team dynamicsThis week let’s look at the brutal reality of superhero teams. Ok it’s not so brutal but it’s just more point I’d like to make.

I’ve recently read the most recent issue of Red Hood and the Outlaws, a comic which follows the adventures of a trio of heroes who didn’t live up to their greatness making their way through life. The team is lead by former death cheating Jason Todd, the second Robin. Roy Harper the recovering alcoholic ex-sidekick of Green Arrow and Starfire, a jaded alien princess who may have been a Teen Titan.

The story I’d like to make my point about follows Jason Todd struggling to come to grips with the reality that the Joker has been manipulating his life since he was a teenager. Jason decides his life is too much to bear and decides to have all of his memory erased.

To most people this sounds like an interesting idea, unless you know comics and the problem with members of the Bat-family being on teams.

Since the beginning of this series it has felt the Jason is the most interesting character and many of the story arcs focus around him and a lot of effort is put into developing his character. It seem that DC are going to address one of books big mysteries. What exactly happened between Roy Harper and Green Arrow for Roy to be disowned?

So to me it seems that Jason has had his memory erased (this wont last, it’s just to much of an adjustment to the status quo) and is going to through the old amnesia tropes to give Roy and Co. a chance to get some character development.

This just always seems to be an issue the Robin legacy. It goes back to the Teen Titans cartoon where Robin had the most character development and back story and it continues even now in the Teen Titans comic as he’s the only one with a real agenda. I guess my solution to this problem is instead of finding silly ways to write these characters out wouldn’t it be worth letting less developed characters have a run of their book for a few issues?

A solo story could help us dive deep into the character and give writers a chance to expand them past a stereotype like Kid Flash being impulsive and dim just because he can run really fast.